Fulminating lymphogranuloma venerum in an HIV-positive middle aged patent mascurading as soft tissue sarcoma

I A Adigun, A Fadeyi, B Adegboro

 

Abstract

This is a case report of a 40-year old male patient presenting with a 17-month history of right inguinal/growing swellings. Initial clinical assessment was suggestive of soft tissue sarcoma, and he was admitted in the surgical ward. Histopathology investigation suggested an inflammatory process was taking place. Assessment for Chlamydia IgG with Enzyme-Linked Immunosorhent Assay (ELISA) using Immunocomb (Organics, Israel) gave a positive titre of 1 in 32. HIV serology using p24 ELISA and Western Blotting gave positive results.
He made significant progress after two weeks on antibiotics and antiretroviral (HAART) therapy.

African Journal of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology Vol. 9 (1) 2008: pp. 59-61

Lymphogranuloma venereum a review of literature

A Fadeyi, I A Adigun, B Adegboro

 

Abstract

Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is a systemic STD caused by Chlamydia trachomatis serotypes L1, L2 and L3. The disease is endemic in parts of Africa, Asia, South America and the Caribbean but rare in Western countries where the disease occurs mainly in sporadic form. Large outbreaks occurred recently in Europe and America mostly among men who have sex with men (MSM). The clinical course of the disease is stratified into primary, secondary and late stages but the presentation may be atypical particularly when coexisting with HIV and may result in diagnostic confusion. We present here a review of literature on LGV.

African Journal of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology Vol. 9 (1) 2008: pp. 53-58

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Prions And Prion Diseases

R K Obi, F C Nwanebu

 

Abstract

A prion is a small infectious particle, which resist inactivation by procedures that modify nucleic acids. Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs also known as prion diseases) are a group of progressive conditions that affects the brain and nervous system of humans and animals and are transmitted by prions. Unlike other kinds of infectious diseases that are spread by microbes, the infectious agent in TSEs is a specific protein called prion protein (PrP). TSEs are unique diseases in that they can be inherited, occur spontaneously (sporadic TSE) or can be spread through infection. The clinical signs of the disease in humans vary, but commonly include personality changes, psychiatric problems such as depression, lack of coordination and/or an unsteady gait (ataxia). Patients also may experience involuntary jerking movements called myoclonus, unusual sensation, insomnia, and confusion or memory problems. In the later stages of the disease, patients may have severe mental impairment (dementia) and may lose the ability to move or speak. Well known prion diseases include scrapie (in sheep and goat), bovine spongiform encephapathy (BSE or mad cow disease) and Creutzfeldt- Jakob disease (CJD). Less well known prion diseases include the transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) (in mink), chronic wasting disease (CWD) (in mule, deer and elk), feline spongiform encephalopathy (FSE) (in cats), Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS), Alpers syndrome, and fatal familial insomnia (FFI). Six of these affect humans: CJD, GSS, FFI, mad cow disease known as (new) variant CJD, (nvCJD), Alpers syndrome and kuru. These conditions form a spectrum of diseases with overlapping signs and symptoms. There is currently no treatment that can cure or control TSEs.

African Journal of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology Vol. 9 (1) 2008: pp. 38-52

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Prions And Prion Diseases