Prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis C and Human Immunodeficiency Virus antibodies in a population of students of tertiary institution in Nigeria

V.O Mabayoje, P.O Akinwusi, O.O Opaleye, B.E Egbewale, A.H Fagbami, A.O Aboderin

 

Abstract

Objective: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C viruses (HCV) are major causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. They are also among the commonest transfusiontransmissible infectious agents. Students of higher institutions are often used as voluntary unpaid donors by many hospitals in Nigeria. In this study, the prevalence of HIV and HCV and HBsAg is determined in a population of students attending Ladoke Akintola University of Technology in south west Nigeria, to provide background information on the burden of these infections in this population. Materials and Methods: Serum samples were obtained from students of the Pre-degree Science programme of Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomosho and tested for antibodies to HIV, HCV and HBsAg using the ELISA procedure. Results: The prevalence rates of antibodies to HIV and HCV in the student population were 0% and 4.8%, respectively and that of HBsAg was 9.5%. Conclusion: The findings of this study which showed that the prevalence of antibodies to HIV and of HBsAg in this group of students is somewhat similar to those carried out in similar populations. This strongly suggests that the viral burden amongst this population of students is similar and that probably similar factors (demographic) are responsible for maintaining this level of viral load. Further studies would be needed to elucidate the reasons why this is the case. Also it would be necessary to reemphasize the methods of prevention of transmission of these viruses, and to ensure their implementation in order to reduce the viral levels and therefore avoid the long term sequalae.

Key words: Transfusion, Infection, Blood Donation

Download full journal in PDF below

Prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis C and Human Immunodeficiency Virus antibodies in a population of students of tertiary institution in Nigeria

Seroprevalence of hepatitis C virus antibodies amongst blood donors in Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital (ABUTH) Kaduna

A.H Isa, A Hassan, A Mamman, A.A Bababdoko, H.M Muktar, A.J Ahmed

 

Abstract

Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the most common transfusion transmissible infections hence the introduction of routine screening for its antibodies in blood donors in most blood banks. Methods: This was a retrospective study in which the blood donor screening register for all intending donors were reviewed and analyzed. Results: There were 4,731 potential donors with age range 20-41years. Eighty six (1.8%) were sero-positive to HCV antibodies with a decreasing incidence over the period under review. The highest incidence was recorded the age group 31-40 years. Aim: To determine the sero-prevalence of HCV among blood donors in ABUTH Kaduna. Conclusion: HCV infection is not uncommon in our environment hence the need to emphasize it’s routine screening among all potential donors.

Download full journal in PDF below

Seroprevalence of hepatitis C virus antibodies amongst blood donors in Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital (ABUTH) Kaduna

Clinical studies on seroprevalence of rubella virus in pregnant women of Cameroon regions

C.N Fokunang, J Chia, P Ndumbe, P Mbu, J Atashili

 

Abstract

A study was conducted to investigate the seroprevalence of the rubella virus amongst pregnant women and the relationship it has with the duration of pregnancy, premature delivery, and past history of abortion in pregnant women visiting the Yaoundé Gynecological, Obstetric and Pediatric Hospital (HGOPY). 211 pregnant women attending the prenatal consultation of mean age 27±5.99 years were randomly selected and screened for rubella IgG antibodies. 39.3% of them were in their third trimester of pregnancy while 25.6% and 35.1% were in their first and second trimester of pregnancy respectively. 11.73% of the women had a history of premature delivery and 40.3% had a history of at least one abortion. Spearman’s correlation was calculated between antibody titre and age. 88.6% of pregnant women were seropositive while 9% (susceptible) were seronagative and 2.4% had equivocal results. The most susceptible women to rubella infection were in the age group 26-30 years while women in the age group 21-25 years band were the most seropositive. There was a strong correlation between the antibody titre and age (r=0.549 p<0.01). There was no statistical difference between the pregnancy in trimesters and antibody titres (p=0.0926) as well as between the number of previous abortions and the antibody titre (p<0.01, r=0.246). No correlations between antibody titre and pregnancy duration, or occurrence of premature births. There was a weak correlation between the antibody titre and number of previous abortions.

Download full journal in PDF below

Clinical studies on seroprevalence of rubella virus in pregnant women of Cameroon regions