Prevalence and management of Falciparium malaria among infants and children in Ota, Ogun state, Southwestern Nigeria

G.I Olasehinde, A.A Ajay, S.O Taiwo, B.T Adekeye, O.A Adeyeba

 

Abstract

Studies were carried out to determine the prevalence of malaria parasite infection among infants and children (0-12yrs) in Ota, Southwestern Nigeria between April and December 2008. The two hospitals used were Ota General Hospital and Covenant University Health Centre, Canaanland, Ota. Thick and thin films were made and stained using standard parasitological procedures. Structured Questionnaires were distributed to ascertain the age, sex, drugs or insecticides used and state of health of the subjects before recruiting them into the study. Overall, 215 (80.5%) of the 267 children investigated were found to have malaria infection. Age group (0-5 years) had the highest frequency rate of 84.7% with mean parasite density of 900 and the difference between the age groups was statistically significant (p<0.05). Children of illiterates from suburb villages had the highest mean parasite density of 850 with 78.1% prevalence rate. 20% of the children were given local herbs and 22% used orthodox medicine as prophylaxis. Only 18% used insecticide treated mosquito nets while 24% of the parents spray insecticides to prevent mosquito bites. There is therefore need for more awareness on effective use of drugs and Insecticide Treated bed nets in malaria hyperendemic regions.

Key words: % Prevalence, malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, infants, Children

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Prevalence and management of Falciparium malaria among infants and children in Ota Ogun state Southwestern Nigeria

 

Plasmodium falciparium parasitemia in pregnancy in relation to maternal anaemia

R.A Akinboro, O Ojurongbe, A.A Akindele, O.A Adefioye, O.S Bolaji, O Olaniran, O.A Adeyeba

 

Abstract

This study was aimed at examining existing relationship between peripheral parasitaemia of Plasmodium falciparum and anemia among pregnant women in a secondary hospital and a tertiary hospital in Osogbo, South-Western, Nigeria. Two hundred and twenty five (225) patients were enrolled into this study, one hundred and fifty (150) from Asubiaro General Hospital, Osogbo and seventy five (75) from LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Osogbo. A total of 30 (13.3%) women carrying the first pregnancy (primigravida), and 195 (86.6%) multiparous women (2-5) were enrolled. Mean age of recruited women was 31.511± SD 1.03, mean gestational age was 2.4267 ± SD 0.72 and mean packed cell volume was also 26.889 ± SD 0.43. Overall prevalence of malaria parasitemia was 63.6% while mean malaria parasite density was 461.33 among women infected with malaria parasite. Prevalence of malaria in pregnancy was highest amongst women with first pregnancy and in the age bracket 26 – 30 years (26.7%) and least among women greater than 40 years. Parasitemia decreased as parity increased, as women acquire immunity to malaria progressively with multiple pregnancies. Mild to moderate anaemia was also found to be prevalent among primigravida (11.6%) and this was associated with malaria parasitemia among these women .No correlated relationship was established between malaria parasitemia and age, gravidity, trimester of pregnancy, and Packed cell volume. Malaria chemoprophylaxis and other methods of malaria control should be sustained and advocacy for inclusion of malaria treatment in safe motherhood should be continued because of its beneficial potentials.

Key words: Malaria, Pregnancy, anaemia.

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Plasmodium falciparium parasitemia in pregnancy in relation to maternal anaemia

 

Seroprevalence and risk factors of Hepatitis C Virus in patients and blood donors in Kano, Nigeria

O Azeez-Akande, A Sarki, E.E Wokedi, A Olabode, P Alabi

 

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of chronic liver disease resulting in cirrhosis and hepatocarcinoma. It is believed to be widespread in Africa but its epidemiology is incomplete and is yet to be determined in many areas of the sub-saharan Africa including Nigeria. Using third generation enzyme immuno-assay (EIA-3) and recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA) technique as confirmatory test, we examined the prevalence of HCV antibodies in 226 blood donors and 226 patients attending Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital (AKTH) in Kano, Nigeria and evaluated the risk factors of HCV transmission in this environment. HCV antibodies were detected in 0.4% and 2.2% blood donors and patients respectively. The overall HCV seroprevalence was 1.3%. There was increased infection acquisition with increasing age; one (16.7%) HCV infection occurred in 25-34 years age group and 5 or 83.3% in subjects > 45 years in age which was significant (P< 0.05). The ratio of infection in male to female was 1:5. Evidence of previous exposure via transfusion was common in HCV seropositive subjects and could be a major risk factor of acquisition in this environment. Adequate screening of blood products in sub- Saharan Africa (Nigeria inclusive) may minimize the risk of HCV transmission and associated health complications.

Key words: Hepatitis C virus, seroprevalence, patients, blood donors, risk factors.

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Seroprevalence and risk factors of Hepatitis C Virus in patients and blood donors in Kano Nigeria