Knowledge and awareness of hepatitis B amongst students of Pamo University of Medical Sciences (PUMS), Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria

[1]Ogban, G. I., *1Iwuafor, A. A., [2]Ushie, S. N., 1Emanghe, U. E., [3]Edadi, U. E., and 4Ekpe, L

1Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria

2Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria

3Department of Internal Medicine, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria

4Department of Chemical Pathology, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria                                       

*Correspondence to: tonyiwuafor@unical.edu.ng.com; +23408033441539

Connaissance et sensibilisation à l’hépatite B parmi les étudiants de l’Université des sciences médicales de Pamo (PUMS),Port Harcourt, État de Rivers, Nigéria

1Ogban, G. I., *1Iwuafor, A. A., 2Ushie, S. N., 1Emanghe, U. E., 3Edadi, U. E., et 4Ekpe, L.

1Département de Microbiologie Médicale et Parasitologie, Université de Calabar, Calabar, Nigéria

2Université Nnamdi Azikiwe, Awka, État d’Anambra, Nigéria

3Département de Médecine Interne, Université de Calabar, Calabar, Nigéria

4Département de Pathologie Chimique, Université de Calabar, Calabar, Nigéria

*Correspondance à: tonyiwuafor@unical.edu.ng.com; +23408033441539

 

Abstract:

Background: Globally, 296 million people were infected by hepatitis B in 2019, with 1.1 million deaths.  Africa is one of the endemic regions. Good knowledge and awareness of hepatitis B remain pivotal to the biosafety of medical students. This study sought to determine the levels of knowledge and awareness of hepatitis B among students of Pamo University of Medical Sciences (PUMS), Port Harcourt, Nigeria, and the predicting factors associated with this knowledge and awareness. The is with the aim of providing recommendations for improving and sustaining biosafety levels for medical and other health-related students of the University. Continue reading “Knowledge and awareness of hepatitis B amongst students of Pamo University of Medical Sciences (PUMS), Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria”

Knowledge, attitude and practice of blood culture: A cross sectional study among medical doctors in a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital

CK Ojide, AI Onwuezobe, EE Asuquo, CS Obiagwu

 

Abstract

Background: Blood culture is one of the most important investigations done in clinical microbiology laboratories. Not only has it been long recognized as the ggold standardh for diagnosis of Blood Stream Infections (BSIs), very important decisions regarding septicaemic patientsf management are based on it. Being a user-dependent diagnostic test, quality of results often depends on the performer.
Aim: To study the knowledge, attitude and practice of blood culture among doctors in a Nigerian tertiary hospital.
Materials and Methods: A pre-tested self-administered semi- structured questionnaire developed by the research team was used to access the biodata, knowledge, attitude and practice of blood culture among doctors in our institution.
Results: Forty-eight (54.5%) out of the 88 doctors studied had good knowledge regarding blood culture, 34 (38.6%) moderate knowledge and 6 (6.8%) poor knowledge. Majority of the senior registrars (75.0%),  registrars (64.3%) and house officers (65.9%) studied had good  knowledge while majority of the consultants (75.0%) had moderate knowledge. Doctors from paediatrics (62.5%) and internal medicine (60.0%) departments had higher proportions with good knowledge  compared to those from surgery (57.9%) and obstetrics and gynaecology (45.0%) (p = 0.240). Majority of the doctors with <10 years experience as doctors (57.0%) had good knowledge compared to 33.3% recorded among those .10 years. Attitude and practice was generally positive.
Conclusion: Through this study areas of unsatisfactory knowledge, attitude and practice of blood culture were identified.
This will help in designing an educational intervention programme for the purpose of addressing identified problems areas in blood culture.

KEYWORDS: Blood culture, Knowledge, Attitude, Practice, Doctors

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Knowledge, attitude and practice of blood culture A cross sectional study among medical doctors in a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital

AIDS knowledge, attitude and behavioural patterns among high school students in southwestern Nigeria

OO Opaleye, OA Olowe, SS Taiwo, O Ojurongbe, OG Ayelagbe

 

Abstract

An evaluation of knowledge, attitude and behavioural patterns of high school students in Oyo and Osun States, Southwestern Nigeria, towards HIV/AIDS was undertaken. A structured questionnaire was administered to respondents from six secondary schools that were selected by systematic random sampling method from the two States. The questionnaire focused on specific aspects of knowledge, attitude and behavioural patterns related to HIV/AIDS, its mode of transmission and preventive measures. Results from the study showed that 362 (73%) of the 496 respondents had correct knowledge of the causative agent of AIDS, 69% had correct knowledge of the mode of transmission, 83.2% had correct knowledge of the people at risk and 80.2% had good knowledge of methods of prevention. Attitude toward AIDS victims was however relatively poor with 21% believing that AIDS patients should be isolated and avoided and additional 7% believing that people should not eat or share utensils with AIDS patients. Only 57.7% believed that people should relate freely with AIDS patients. This study showed an improvement in the knowledge and attitude towards HIV/AIDS over a previous one carried out over a decade ago in the same locality, highlighting the importance of mass media campaign programme embarked upon by the States over the years. However, there is need to further increase the awareness campaign especially as it relates to attitude towards AIDS patients and also on information dissemination, which should be more detailed and formal. Incorporating sex education into the curriculum of secondary schools will be a welcome development in stemming the tide of this dreaded disease.

Keywords: knowledge, attitude, sexual behaviour, HIV, AIDS

African Journal of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology Vol. 6 (3) 2005: 247-252

Knowledge, Attitude And Perceptions Of Onchocerciasis In A Hyper-Endemic Community Of Edo State, Nigeria

VA Wagbatsoma, MSO Aisien

 

Abstract

An evaluation of the knowledge, attitude and perception of Ekpan, a rural community in Edo State of Nigeria, towards onchocerciasis after 3 years of ivermectin distribution was undertaken. The structured questionnaire administered to the respondents focused on specific aspects of knowledge, attitude and perception related to the disease, its mode of transmission and control activities in the village. Results from the survey showed that 133 (68.6%) had fair knowledge of the disease. All subjects knew the bite of the blackflies was followed by itching but none knew that bites were accompanied by Onchocerca volvulus transmission. Level of education influenced knowledge of the disease and the relationship was statistically significant (P<0.05). Knowledge of the clinical manifestation was however poor. Majority of the respondents (83.0%) perceived the disease to be due to other causes other than Onchocerca volvulus. Knowledge of the side effects of ivermectin treatment was good while knowledge of those excluded from treatment was generally fair. Their attitude to ivermectin distribution was strongly influenced by adverse reactions to the drug, leading either to outright rejection or discontinuation of the treatment after initial acceptance. The most prevalent reactions were swelling of leg/feet (22.2%), followed by itching (17.5%) and weakness (9.8%). The respondents perceived the different clinical manifestation of onchocerciasis to be specific disease entities. Onchocercal nodules were believed to be blood clots; leopard skin was thought to be healed scars of wounds and cuts accidentally acquired in the course of farming while hanging groin was regarded as hernia. In conclusion, ignorance of the cause of the disease negatively influenced their attitude and perception. Therefore, for maximum impact on morbidity and transmission to be achieved with ivermectin treatment, knowledge of the disease and control activities should be imparted to the residents. Such health education should of necessity take into consideration community attitude and culture, which promote health-seeking behaviour.

Key Words: Knowledge, attitudes, perception, onchocerciasis, ivermectin

Afr. J. Clin. Exper. Microbiol. 2004; 5 (3): 235-241