Knowledge and awareness of hepatitis B amongst students of Pamo University of Medical Sciences (PUMS), Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria

[1]Ogban, G. I., *1Iwuafor, A. A., [2]Ushie, S. N., 1Emanghe, U. E., [3]Edadi, U. E., and 4Ekpe, L

1Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria

2Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria

3Department of Internal Medicine, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria

4Department of Chemical Pathology, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria                                       

*Correspondence to: tonyiwuafor@unical.edu.ng.com; +23408033441539

Connaissance et sensibilisation à l’hépatite B parmi les étudiants de l’Université des sciences médicales de Pamo (PUMS),Port Harcourt, État de Rivers, Nigéria

1Ogban, G. I., *1Iwuafor, A. A., 2Ushie, S. N., 1Emanghe, U. E., 3Edadi, U. E., et 4Ekpe, L.

1Département de Microbiologie Médicale et Parasitologie, Université de Calabar, Calabar, Nigéria

2Université Nnamdi Azikiwe, Awka, État d’Anambra, Nigéria

3Département de Médecine Interne, Université de Calabar, Calabar, Nigéria

4Département de Pathologie Chimique, Université de Calabar, Calabar, Nigéria

*Correspondance à: tonyiwuafor@unical.edu.ng.com; +23408033441539

 

Abstract:

Background: Globally, 296 million people were infected by hepatitis B in 2019, with 1.1 million deaths.  Africa is one of the endemic regions. Good knowledge and awareness of hepatitis B remain pivotal to the biosafety of medical students. This study sought to determine the levels of knowledge and awareness of hepatitis B among students of Pamo University of Medical Sciences (PUMS), Port Harcourt, Nigeria, and the predicting factors associated with this knowledge and awareness. The is with the aim of providing recommendations for improving and sustaining biosafety levels for medical and other health-related students of the University. Continue reading “Knowledge and awareness of hepatitis B amongst students of Pamo University of Medical Sciences (PUMS), Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria”

Evaluation of serum concentration of essential trace elements during therapy among tuberculosis patients in Uyo, Nigeria

*[1]Umo, A. N., [2]Umoh, S. G., 2Jimmy, N. F., and 2Adie, S. A.

1Department of Medical Laboratory Science, College of Health Sciences, University of Uyo, Nigeria

2Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Basic Clinical Sciences, University of Uyo, Nigeria

*Correspondence to: anthonyumo@uniuyo.edu.ng

Abstract:

Background: Nutritional status is one of the most important determinants of immune response to infection. The objective of this study was to assess the serum concentrations of selected trace elements in selected patients on anti-tuberculosis (TB) therapy in Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria Continue reading “Evaluation of serum concentration of essential trace elements during therapy among tuberculosis patients in Uyo, Nigeria”

Determinants of COVID-19 vaccine acceptance amongst doctors practising in Cross River State, Nigeria

1Iwuafor, A. A., 1Ogban, G. I., 1Ita, O. I., 2Offiong, A. B., 2Owai, P. A., 1Udoh, U. A., and 3Elem, D. E.

1Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Basic Clinical Sciences, University of Calabar, Nigeria

2Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria

3Department of Internal Medicine, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria

*Correspondence to: tonyiwuafor@unical.edu.ng; +2348033441539; ORCID ID: 0000-0001-6796-3870

Abstract:

Background: COVID-19 vaccine is one of the most effective public health intervention approaches for prevention of COVID-19. Despite its well-known efficacy and safety, significant proportion of frontline COVID-19 healthcare workers remain hesitant about accepting the vaccine for whatever reasons. This study aimed to determine acceptance rate and determinants of vaccine refusal among doctors in Cross River State, Nigeria. Continue reading “Determinants of COVID-19 vaccine acceptance amongst doctors practising in Cross River State, Nigeria”

Comparative gender analysis of the seroprevalence of varicella zoster virus among HIV-infected individuals receiving care at Offa, north-central Nigeria

*1Udeze, A. O., and 2Odebisi-Omokanye, M.

1Virology Unit, Department of Microbiology, University of Ilorin, P.M.B 1515, Ilorin, Nigeria

2Infectious Disease, Environmental Health and Toxicity Research Group, Department of Microbiology, University of Ilorin, P.M.B 1515, Ilorin, Nigeria            *Correspondence to: udeze.ao@unilorin.edu.ng; austok90@yahoo.com; +2348135586003

ORCiD: 0000-0002-5492-4925

Abstract:

Background: Varicella zoster virus (VZV) infections are common and contribute substantially to morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected patients. This study was conducted to determine the level of exposure, compare the gender distribution pattern and correlate with CD4 count, history of chicken pox and demographics among HIV patients.

Methodology: Blood samples were collected from 273 randomly selected HIV-positive patients (93 males and 180 females) receiving care and management at the General Hospital Offa, Kwara State, Nigeria, between September 2019 and March 2020, after obtaining informed consent. Sera were separated from the blood samples and tested for the presence of VZV-specific IgG antibodies using Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Continue reading “Comparative gender analysis of the seroprevalence of varicella zoster virus among HIV-infected individuals receiving care at Offa, north-central Nigeria”

Malaria treatment failure after Artemisinin-based combination therapy: A case series of children managed at a private tertiary hospital in southwest Nigeria

1,2*Fatunla, O. A. T., 3,4Irek, E. O., 1,2Oyebanji, A. H., 2Adisa, S. O., [1]Jesulana, T. E., and 2Ajibola, T. O.

1Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Afe Babalola University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

2Department of Paediatrics, Afe Babalola Multi-System Hospital, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria                                              

3Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Basic Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Afe Babalola University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

4Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Afe Babalola Multi-System Hospital, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

5Department of Internal Medicine, Afe Babalola Multi-System Hospital, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria                                

*Correspondence to: odunayofatunla@abuad.edu.ng; +2348034397539; ORCiD: //orcid.org/0000000228391491

Contributed equally to the study

Abstract:

Malaria treatment failure is the inability to clear parasitaemia after antimalarial drug administration. There are reports of treatment failure with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in Nigeria but few reported among children. We report three paediatric cases of treatment failure with ACT admitted at a private tertiary hospital in Nigeria in early 2022. All three were ‘under-fives’ admitted for open-heart surgery, major flame burns, and cerebral malaria respectively. They had symptomatic Plasmodium falciparum infection but one had mixed P. falciparum and Plasmodium vivax infections. Cases 1 and 2 were initially given oral artemether-lumefantrine while case 3 received intravenous artesunate. Despite appropriate antimalarial drug compliance, all the 3 still had fever with heavy parasitaemia. They subsequently received intravenous quinine, with improvement within the first 24 hours of therapy, and no longer had fever at the fourth week of follow-up. Although ACT resistance was not established, poor drug quality may have contributed to treatment failure. There is a need for pharmacovigilance of anti-malarial in Nigeria. Continue reading “Malaria treatment failure after Artemisinin-based combination therapy: A case series of children managed at a private tertiary hospital in southwest Nigeria”

A point-prevalence survey of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in two different cities in Kuwait and Nigeria 

[1]Jamal, W., [2]Iregbu, K., 1Al Fadhli, A., 1Khodakhast, F., 2Nwajiobi-Princewill, P., 2Medugu, N., and *3Rotimi, V. O.

1Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, Kuwait

2Department of Clinical Microbiology, National Hospital, Abuja, Nigeria                                                  

3Department of Medical Microbiology, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Ikeja, Nigeria

*Correspondence to: bunmivr@yahoo.com; +234 909 215 0971

Abstract: 

Background: The family Enterobacteriaceae belongs to the order Enterobacterales, a large diverse group of Gramnegative, facultatively anaerobic bacteria that sometimes cause multidrug-resistant infections which treatment options are often challenging. They are the leading cause of nosocomial bloodstream infection (BSI) and urinary tract infections (UTI). The objective of the study was to carry out a point-prevalence survey of antimicrobial resistance and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) clinical isolates in two hospitals in Kuwait and Nigeria. Continue reading “A point-prevalence survey of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in two different cities in Kuwait and Nigeria “

Prevalence of bacterial vaginosis in pregnant women attending Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria using the complete Amsel’s diagnostic criteria

*1Udeogu, C. V., 1Agbakoba, N. R., 1Chukwuma, L. N., 2Okwelogu, S. I., and 3Oguejiofor, C. B.

1Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Medical Microbiology Unit, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi, Anambra State, Nigeria

2Department of Parasitology and Entomology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria

3Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria

*Correspondence to: chidozie.udeogu@yahoo.com

Abstract:

Background: Bacterial vaginosis (BV) in pregnant women remains a cause for clinical concern among clinicians and health care professionals. BV has been linked to prenatal, antenatal and postnatal challenges in pregnant women. Information on prevalence of BV across trimesters of pregnancy is expected to give better clinical insight into the pathophysiology of this polymicrobial disorder. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of BV in pregnant women attending the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH), Nnewi, Nigeria. Continue reading “Prevalence of bacterial vaginosis in pregnant women attending Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria using the complete Amsel’s diagnostic criteria”

Prevalence of antibiotic residues in body organs of pigs slaughtered in Jos, Nigeria

*1Anueyiagu, K. N., 1Nandi, S., 1Uzochukwu, I. A., and 2Sule, S. O.

1Federal College of Animal Health and Production Technology, NVRI Vom, Nigeria

2Federal College of Veterinary and Medical Laboratory Technology, NVRI Vom, Nigeria

*Correspondence to: anueyiagunnamdi@yahoo.com; +2348035841582;

ORCiD: //orcid.org/0000000225667982

Abstract:

Background: Drug residue is a serious issue for the food chain when antimicrobial substances are inappropriately used or when the withdrawal times before slaughtering the treated animals are not respected. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of antibiotic residues in pork slaughtered for human consumption in Jos South Local Government Area (LGA), Plateau State, Nigeria. Continue reading “Prevalence of antibiotic residues in body organs of pigs slaughtered in Jos, Nigeria”

Prevalence and risk factors of acute gastroenteritis caused by Rotavirus among children in tertiary hospitals, southeastern Nigeria

*1Igwe, D., 2Oshun, P., 2Osuagwu, C., 1Efunshile, A., and 2Oduyebo, O.

1Department of Medical Microbiology, College of Medicine/Alex Ekwueme Federal University Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, PMB 102, Ebonyi State, Nigeria
2College of Medicine/Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi-Araba, University of Lagos, Nigeria*Correspondence to: daniel.igwe@npmcn.edu.ng.

Abstract:
Background: Diarrhea is a worldwide problem and rotavirus is the commonest viral etiologic agent. In Nigeria, diarrhea causes more than 315,000 deaths of preschool-age children annually. In Ebonyi State, it is among the leading causes of pediatric emergency visits and one of the major causes of infant morbidity and mortality. This study was aimed at determining the prevalence and associated risk factors of acute gastroenteritis due to rotavirus infection among under-five children in Abakaliki, Ebonyi state.

This was a cross-sectional study of 275 children under 5 years of age hospitalized for acute watery diarrhea, who were consecutively recruited into the study. Stool samples were collected from each child for rotavirus antigen detection using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Socio-demographic information of each child and selected risk factors were collected using structured questionnaire. Data analysis was done on SPSS software version 20.0, and association of demographic characteristics and risk factors with rotavirus diarrhoea was measured using Chi-square test, odds ratio (and 95% confidence interval). Significant value was set at p < 0.05. Continue reading “Prevalence and risk factors of acute gastroenteritis caused by Rotavirus among children in tertiary hospitals, southeastern Nigeria”

Clinical symptoms and outcomes among hospitalized COVID-19 patients in Ondo State, Southwestern Nigeria

*1Usman, S. O., 2Busari, I. I., 3Fagbemi, S., 2Adeniyi, M. M., 2Irabor, P., 4Usman, I. N.,
and 5Akintayo-Usman, N. O.

1APIN Public Health Initiatives, Akure, Ondo State, Nigeria
2Infectious Disease Hospital, Akure, Ondo State, Nigeria
3Ondo State Ministry of Health, Akure, Ondo State, Nigeria
4Department of Public Health, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Oyo State, Nigeria
5Nurse Tutors Programme, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria

*Correspondence to: senatorhopsy@yahoo.com

Abstract:
Background: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a novel strain of coronavirus, which is the cause of the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, ravaging many countries of the world. The objective of this study is to assess the symptomatology and case management outcome of hospitalized COVID-19 patients in Ondo State, Southwestern Nigeria.

Methodology: This was a longitudinal study carried out on randomly selected patients with COVID-19, confirmed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR), admitted to the Infectious Disease Hospital, Akure, from March to July 2020. Clinical and outcome data obtained from the patients were analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 24.0 software, and variables were compared using the Chi square (χ²) test and Odds ratio (OR).

Results: A total of 215 hospitalized COVID-19 patients were randomly recruited, with 103 males and 112 females (M:F ratio of 1:1.1), and mean age of 37.24 ± 16.83 years. The most common symptoms were shortness of breath (22.8%), cough (18.6%), fatigue (17.2%), runny nose (16.7%), fever (16.3%), and sneezing (14.0%). Mortality rate among the patients was 4.7% (10/215). Statistical analysis showed that fever [χ² = 8.75, OR 2.17 (95% CI: 0.29-16.63), p=0.003] and sneezing [χ²=11.35, OR 2.75 (95% CI: 0.34-18.27), p=0.001] were clinical presentations with significant impact on the final outcome of the patients.

Conclusion: This study showed that the most common symptoms in hospitalized COVID-19 patients were shortness of breath, cough, running nose, fever and sneezing, which underscores the importance of monitoring of patients for these symptoms.

Keywords: COVID-19, symptoms, management, hospitalized, outcome, Nigeria
Received Mar 8, 2021; Revised Apr 24, 2021; Accepted Apr 26, 2021

Copyright 2021 AJCEM Open Access. This article is licensed and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attrition 4.0 International License <a rel=”license” href=”//creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/”, which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided credit is given to the original author(s) and the source.

Editor-in-Chief: Prof. S. S. Taiwo

Symptômes cliniques et résultats chez les patients hospitalisés COVID-19 dans l’État d’Ondo, dans le sud-ouest du Nigéria

*1Usman, S. O., 2Busari, I. I., 3Fagbemi, S., 2Adeniyi, M. M., 2Irabor, P., 4Usman, I. N., et 5Akintayo-Usman, N. O.

1Initiatives de santé publique 1APIN, Akure, État d’Ondo, Nigéria

2Hôpital des maladies infectieuses, Akure, État d’Ondo, Nigéria

3Ministère de la Santé de l’État de Ando, Akure, État d’Ondo, Nigéria

4Département de la santé publique, Université de technologie Ladoke Akintola, Ogbomoso, État d’Oyo, Nigéria

5Programme d’infirmières tuteurs, Hôpital universitaire, Ibadan, État d’Oyo, Nigéria

*Correspondance à: senatorhopsy@yahoo.com

Abstrait:

Contexte: Le coronavirus-2 du syndrome respiratoire aigu sévère (SRAS-CoV-2) est une nouvelle souche de coronavirus, qui est à l’origine de la pandémie actuelle de coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19), ravageant de nombreux pays du monde. L’objectif de cette étude est d’évaluer les résultats de la symptomatologie et de la prise en charge des cas de patients hospitalisés COVID-19 dans l’État d’Ondo, dans le sud-ouest du Nigéria.

Méthodologie: Il s’agissait d’une étude longitudinale réalisée sur des patients sélectionnés au hasard atteints de COVID-19, confirmée par réaction en chaîne par transcriptase-polymérase inverse en temps réel (rRT-PCR), admis à l’hôpital des maladies infectieuses d’Akure de mars à juillet 2020. Les données cliniques et les résultats obtenus des patients ont été analysés à l’aide du logiciel Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 24.0, et les variables ont été comparées à l’aide du test du Chi carré (χ²) et du rapport de cotes (OR). Continue reading “Clinical symptoms and outcomes among hospitalized COVID-19 patients in Ondo State, Southwestern Nigeria”